Sunday, October 2, 2011

Weighing In



   Hal Joyce is recognized as the man who  invented a weighing scale ,as a measuring instrument for determining the weight or mass of an object.
     The oldest existence of weighing scales dates to c. 2400-1800 B.C. in Pakistan. Uniform polishes stone cubes discovered in early settlements were probably used as weight setting stones in a balance scale. Egyptian Hieroglyphic symbols for gold have been discovered, which suggest the Egyptian Merchants had been using a weight system.
    The earlier design for a scale dates to 1770 and is credited to Richard Salter.He brought the first spring balance scale into wide spread use in the 18th century. In England he began making what is today known as a fishermans scale,which used a spring balance to measure weight. The spring scale is a weighing scale often used to measure force, such as the force of gravity, exerted on a mass ,on the force of a persons grip.The force is commonly measured in Newtons or pounds. Many spring scales are marked on the face,"not for legal trade,"as they are not always accurate.
    The Dictionary defines the spring scale as an apparatus with a simple spring fixed on one end and a hook to attach an object on the other end. It works by,"Hooke's law," which states that the force needed to extend a spring, is proportioned to the distance, that the spring is extended from it's rest position. Therefore the scale markings on the spring scale, are equally spaced. Standard measurement was established in the 13th century by King Edward 1st of England. The standard soon traveled through trade and became somewhat acceptable in other parts of the world.








     Richard  Salter and his nephew , George, patented the spring scale in 1838. They formed one of the first spring scale making companies, George Salter and Company.Scales with these markings are highly sought after by today"s collectors.
     In 1840 R. W. Winfield developed the candlestick scale for use in measuring packages. This made it possible to measure weight faster -as the balance scale required adding and removing weights.
    By 1940's various electric devices were being designed, but was not until the late 20th century that they became accurate enough for wide spread use.
    In a typical spring scale- the spring stretches or compresses in proportion to how hard the earth pulls down on the object. It is there fore affected by the local flow of gravity and objects do not always way the same in one area  as compared to the next.
    The spring scale was most often used in fish markets, and soon took the nick name ."fish scale." They were used up and until the first part of the 21 century. Today in rural areas and small markets they are still widely used. They have become very collectible and have been sought after for years by antique hunters.
    I do not know why I am attracted to certain items. I have collected spring scales more than once in my life. At one time I had a big wall full. Sold them off and thought I was over them. Here while back, when I was on a antique shopping trip, I ran across a few scales and they just called my name. I had not bought any for awhile and had no ideal what they were selling for theses days. I asked the  seller to make me a package deal, he did, I did, and they came home with me. When thinking about the 1845 Historic Elgin/Cottrell House Museum, aka, My Old Historic House, I like to find and collect items that would be of interest to the tourist that come for a tour. I have to especially keep in mind the gentlemen and try and have a few items that they can relate to and like. Well the scales always seem to do the trick. Almost every gentlemen tourist has a story to tell about a scale. Sometimes it was there father or grandfather that had one. Often it leads to other types of scales and I say, I will have to look into getting a few of those.And you can rest assured , that gentlemen went home with a good tour experience.
    The scales I am sharing with you today are all English., made of brass and iron and are very beautiful examples. I hope you like them and enjoy them as much as I do. Maybe you can come some day for a real tour. I will leave the lights on and Sissy Dog will always meet you with a jump and a kiss. I hope you all are having beautiful fall weather, we sure are here in Missouri. I hope it will continue for awhile as the leaves are just starting to get beautiful.
   










The beauty that is fall in rural Missouri

36 comments:

Pamela Gordon said...

What a unique collection. I think they are quite nice hanging in the kitchen. I love the blue and white dishes as well and that gorgeous coverlet??

we three dogs and me said...

Very interesting collection. Never have seen these before. Don't feel bad I usualy eat in my recliner with a dog on either side. I don't want to mess up my table haha.I usually cook for one fast and cheap . Use my money for other people's junk to make fun tables. It is important to eat heart healthy food to keep well not out of the can. Lots of fruit and fresh veggies. My down fall is pizza and ice cream.

we three dogs and me said...

By the way Christine one of your blogger friends said she stopped by your shop and home. One of my dreams would be to do that but there is no way.Love your home but I couldn't sit back with my feet curled up haha. just a simple woman with simple living.

Jane and Lance Hattatt said...

Hello Richard:
Yet another most interesting and informative post. Salter scales, as you will surely know, are still very much in evidence in Great Britain but your collection here, of different makes and drawn from a variety of sources, is most impressive. We should most certainly love to see them for real; this post is definitely the next best thing.

Jane and Lance Hattatt said...

Hello Richard:
Yet another most interesting and informative post. Salter scales, as you will surely know, are still very much in evidence in Great Britain but your collection here, of different makes and drawn from a variety of sources, is most impressive. We should most certainly love to see them for real; this post is definitely the next best thing.

Penny @ The Comforts of Home/Flea Market Makeovers said...

I love those scales! Thank you for sharing all the info on them.

Ann from On Sutton Place said...

You are so generous sharing all of your collections. These scales are among your best. I'm happy your weather is good and Fall has arrived. Same here in Ohio. Our leaves are still quite green but will start changing soon I expect. Have a good week...

Robin's Egg Bleu said...

Very interesting! Are any of these scales the type that a normal housewife would have used in her kitchen?

Curtains In My Tree said...

Oh Richard

those brings back memories of my Grandfather who loved to fish and carried one in his tackle box like in your first picture the one on the right . I kept the scale and gave his tackle box to a great grandchild of his who loves to fish also.

I have it hanging right here on my desk it says made in Germany ? which also says pocket balance.

Janice

Acquired Objects said...

My Grandmother had a couple of scales like this but I never appreciated their beauty until now. I can see why you're attracted to them they're amazing and love the history. Enjoy the rest of your evening with Sissy girl!

Sissysmom said...

Hi Richard- thanks for another interesting post. I have a small scale that I got from my Great Aunt and Uncle. They had a "backroom" in their house where they put all their "old" stuff. They used to let me go pick stuff out of it when I would visit. Some of my favorite pieces came from there.

Thanks for the fall picture, it makes me home sick for the midwest. The changing of the seasons is one thing I really miss being in Arizona.

Michele

Babs said...

Your scales are so interesting and so unusual. Thanks for telling all about them. Have a great week.

Divine Theatre said...
This comment has been removed by the author.
Divine Theatre said...

Urgent! I cannot send you an email! It keeps coming back! I can pick him up and bring him to you! I wll even buy a six month supply of food!
http://chicago.craigslist.org/nwc/grd/2628463542.html

xoxo
Andie

Anna at the Doll House said...

I can well understand the attraction of these old scales Richard. For me, it is the very attractive brass work and they make such an interesting display together with your transfer printed dishes.

Anna

Bohemian said...

You always have the most interesting and lovely Collections my Friend... and so much knowledge about it all!

Blessings from the Arizona Desert... Dawn... The Bohemian

Bohemian said...

PS: I thought I would add that the only types of Scales I don't like having around the House are those that I would have to step on and get the depressing news about. *winks*

Dawn... The Bohemian

xinex said...

Oh these are awesome, Richard. Being a laboratory tech and having worked in a lab for so many years, I love scales. You sure have a lot of unique and interesting collections...Christine

Rhissanna said...

I love the patina on these. Very lovely and such a clever idea hanging them with the blue and white transfer plates.

LaPouyette said...

Oh Richard, these weighing objects are simply wonderful!
You are surprising me more and more!
I there ever an end of your collections ???

Greetings from the PĂ©rigord,
karin

Olive Cooper said...

I love Chattillion scales and knew a member of the family. I worked with a nurse by that name (from NYC) and she was part of that family who made those scales way back when. I think your collection is quite beautiful. ♥Olive

Sherry @ No Minimalist Here said...

Richard, These scales are fabulous. I have always loved vintage scales and you have some wonderful ones.
Hugs,
Sherry

FABBY'S LIVING said...

You have such fabulous things and collections dear Richard! I sure love this unique collection and all the blue and white Hutchenreuther we both love so much! Thanks for your visit to my bedroom for tea, I will share when I redo the rest of it, meanwhile I'm having my dining and living rooms painted. Hugs, FABBY

Shelia said...

Hi Richard! Oh, what a wonderful collection! I've never seen things like this before. Your entire wall decor here is wonderful! I love those pretty dough rollers and they look like porcelain! :) The blue and white is so pretty!
You have such amazing things. One day I'm going to get to Missouri! :)
Be a sweetie,
Shelia ;)

Butterbean Row said...

Hi Richard,
Enjoyed the treatise on scales. I always learn something when I visit. How nice that you think of the gentlemen who visit your home.
I am surprised at how your states trees are already changed. Ours here in Georgia, at least where I am , are still green. But it is nice and cool.

♥charlotte

An Historical Lady said...

Excellent post, Richard! LOVE all your blue. You must be knee deep in preparations for the tours this weekend. Great good wishes!
Hugs,
Mary

http://anhistoricallady.blogspot.com

debchester said...

This is freaky. Saturday I bought my first scale at an estate sale. Spent the weekend wondering where I would hang it or how I would display it. Now you've provided me with a quick history of these scales that's fascinating.

Oh, and the blaze of fall orange at the end of this post is beautiful. Thanks for sharing. I miss the fall colors that we seldom get out here on the prairie.

Deb

Ann@A Sentimental Life said...

love the patina they all have, great for a vintage kitchen

Jann Olson said...

Hi,
Those scales are absolutely wonderful! What an awesome collection. I like how you have them displayed. Now a new follower.

Ivy and Elephants said...

Wow Richard, such a fabulous collection! I just love vintage scales and you post has given me just the right idea for the kitchen to hang my fern!
The blue and white is lovely and I just swooned when I saw the rolling pins. Gorgeous!
Patti

very merry vintage style said...

They are really interesting-such an informative post--the hooks are a little scary! Thanks for linking to Share the Love Wednesday
Mary

Mary Ellen said...

What a great collection of weights Richard! I have one of these and need to get it out and use it. love all the history your shared about weights.

Thanks so much for your comments to my Design Challenge at Debras. My house is certainly an assorted mixture of furniture and pieces that we have picked up over the years. You really helped me to to see the different styles of each piece and hopefully I can figure out how exactly I want the room to feel. I have been so used to just making do with the things things that I have that I don't focus in any one direction I think.

bee blessed
mary

Susan (Between Naps on the Porch) said...

Richard, you have the neatest collections! Loves seeing these wonderful old weighing devices.

lvroftiques said...

Ya know Richard this is one thing that I've never collected. I've seen them in different places over the years but never was tempted...until now *winks* They're very very cool! I'll let you know if I buy one....cuz it'll be all your fault! Lol! Vanna

Jo's This and That said...

Beautiful! Iwill be coming up some day!Thanks for sharing,JoAnn

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